Writing

Whatever You Do, Do It Well

  • March 13, 2010

Whatever you set out to do in life, do it well. Too often in our lives we are faced with people who just want to come to work, get paid, and go home. Most people don’t like their jobs, and for the most part, it is quite obvious to me when a person ia dissatisfied with their employment.

Poor customer service leads to customer dissatisfaction, which long term, can cause a business to ruin their reputation, and eventually fail.

Unlike most people from my generation, every job I’ve ever had, I took it seriously. I treated my position, regardless of how insignificant and/or entry level it might have been at the time, as if it was the most important job I’ve ever had. In life, work ethic goes hand-in-hand with success; if people notice your hard work, you will succeed. On the other hand, if you show a poor work ethic and don’t care about what you are doing, you are wasting everyone else’s time, as well as your own.

Sadly, it has been my experience that some employers are too careless themselves to take time out to observe how their business is being run by their employees, and without them, there would be no work being done, money coming in, and therefore, no business to speak of. I know this because for many years, I worked for other people, and while I can’t definitively say that I was the hardest working employee of all time, I can say with a good amount of confidence that I was well above average. Unfortunately, my efforts generally went unnoticed, at least by the employers, but they were, however noticed by my peers, some of whom perceived my work ethics as a threat to their position.

Eventually, I moved on to start up my own business built upon the three basic fundamentals of honesty, integrity, and hard work. Unlike most businesses, I refused to bill for services that were rendered unnecessarily, or those which failed to solve the problem or satisfy the customers needs. I refused to bill my customers in increments of 15 minutes. Instead of trying to sell my customers the most expensive solution in hopes of making a huge profit, I sold them the right solution for their needs.

A good business is set up to make as much money as possible within the shortest time frame; a better business takes time out to get to know their customer, what their needs are, and is there whenever the customer needs them, always at the ready to provide the customer with the tools and solutions they need at a reasonable honest price they can afford.

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